Neutering dogs and bitches

Castration (Neutering male dogs)

Castration of male dogs is most commonly advised to correct or reduce unwanted male behaviour like aggression, hypersexuality and roaming / constantly trying to escape from home to go looking for love and adventure. Castration may also be advised to prevent or treat some medical conditions, conditions such as prostatic hyperplasia/tumours, perineal hernias, testicular tumours. Castration is not neccesarily appropriate for all male dogs so we advise discussing this procedure with us during visits for primary vaccinations and subsequent puppy growth checks and socialization visits.

castration

Surgery is relatively straightforward involving removal of the testicles through a small excision in the scrotum while under a general anaesthetic. Castration may be performed from 6 months of age, a little older in larger breed dogs.

Chemical castration using a hormone implant is now available. This has been in use for some years in France and Germany and now is licensed to be used in the UK. It involves injecting an implant into the scruff of the dog, where it slowly releases a hormone fro 6 months or 12 months. It is useful for people considering neutering, but not wanting surgery, and used in elderly dogs with anal adenoma tumours which are benign but testosterone dependent.

 

Spaying (Neutering female dogs)

Spaying female dogs is done primarily fro very significant health benifits. It is also important in terms of controlling unwanted oestral behaviour (coming into season) as well as prevention of unwanted litters. There are several medical reasons to neuter pet dogs and cats tghat improve health and general behaviour. Traditionally in the UK, we carry out ovario(hyster)ectomy in young bitches from 6-8 months of age, and in some places ther are early neutering programs from as early as 12=14 weeks old.

Indications for neutering

  • Prevention of unwanted litters or to prevent passing on of undersirable genetic traits.
  • Preventionof unwanted oestral behavior (comming ibto season ot “heat”)
  • Reduction in the incidence of mammary tumours.
  • Prevention of pyometra and uterine/vaginal neoplasia.
  • More placid temperment.
  • In some cases, gut sensitivity may improve.

Disadvantages

  • Weight gain.
  • Reduced activity levels.
  • Hair coat changes, especially red coated bitches.
  • Urinary incontinance ( though this may be seen in intact biches later in life as well).
spaying

There are many myths about when to spay a bitch i.e. should she have a first season or not, should she have a litter of pups or not, will it change her personality ect. We believe that all non-breeding bitches should be neutered and the bset time to do this is anywhere from 5 months of age and before her second season. The most appropriate time to spay your bitch will be determined by her and her specific circumstances and we are always happy to discuss the best time for your particular bitch with you.

If a bitch has had a season, we sdvise surgery 8-10 weeks post season, as this is the optimal time to reduce complications from haemorrhage or milk hormone production.